Biscayne National Park

On June 28, 1980, the U.S. Congress designated the former Biscayne National Monument as Biscayne National Park. Situated on Florida’s southern Atlantic coast, Biscayne is a marine water park for 95% of its area. Biscayne National Park is a living observatory of marine ecosystems that are routinely impacted by ocean currents, changing sea level, subtropical climate effects, and seasonal hurricanes.

It contains a 32 km (20 mi) shoreline fringe of one of longest continuous stretches of remaining mangrove forest on the state’s East coast. Three different species of mangroves – red, black, and white – provide their massive real estate to hundreds of animal species. Their roots that arch from sea level to trunk base provide shelter and protection to marine organisms. Their branches and canopy provide birds with breeding and nesting areas.

Above and below water, mangrove trees support life and protect shorelines. [ photo from NOAA]

Above and below water, mangrove trees support life and protect shorelines.
[ photo from NOAA]

The ocean bay shallows host seagrass meadows that, in turn, harbour myriad marine life and seafowl on the hunt for it. Along its ocean boundary are low-lying coral reef barrier islands. The coral reefs, although fragile and biologically diverse, are available and accessible to park visitors with park ranger oversight.

Commitment and biodiversity vision are highlighted in the park’s programs, some of which are shared in the Resource Management section in a video collection that includes Using Sponges for Reef Restoration, Seagrass Restoration, Protecting Sea Turtles, Derelict Trap and Debris Removal.

B Bondar / Real World Content Advantage

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